Arlington Heights Mural

New Mural in Arlington Heights Pedestrian Underpass
Posted on 08/12/2022

In 2020, the Kensington Pedestrian Underpass was the location of racist graffiti. In response, a resident approached the Village with the idea to install an inclusive mural that celebrated all residents. 

The Arlington Heights Arts Commission held an art competition, seeking entries for a mural that would feature the letters of ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, each with a unique design that reflected a unique component of the Arlington Heights community, and the people who live, work, or visit our Village. 

The mural was installed in the summer of 2022. Below is information about the design and the artists who created the artwork. 




About the Mural and the Artists


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Kelly Ward- Kelly’s design includes art that reflects the culture, landmarks, nature, and history of Arlington Heights. The design includes imagery that shows arts and entertainment destinations, the clocktower at Arlington Heights Village Hall intended to represent commuters, bike baths which represent our bicycle friendly community, and the former Arlington Park Racetrack that served as a historic destination for nearly 100 years. 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Annalee Strasburg- Annalee’s design was painted with oil on canvas. “I felt strongly that our Village and neighborhoods become free from the pernicious effects of racial prejudice and attain a diverse and unified society that demonstrated the oneness of human family. This painting depicts a young, multi-racial child pulling a bunch of carrots to take to the Arlington Heights Farmers Market.”  

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Beth McGeehan- The mixed media mosaic design is meant to represent Arlington Heights’ green and open spaces year-round, throughout the seasons. 

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Maureen Sullivan- The artwork includes a colorful stack of books with their titles displayed. Maureen said the artwork was inspired by the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, which she describes as an institution that fosters inclusion and diversity in our community. “Through outreach programs, digital services, and collection of materials, the library encourages cross-cultural and inter-generational connection. The design also recognizes the ‘One Book One Village’ program, which invites the community to read the same books together, to create a culture of community and unified conversations.” The books listed in the design celebrate a wide range of genres and subjects, and material that shares different perspectives, identities, and stories. 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Jonathan Pruc- The design includes a photograph of the butterfly garden at Heritage Park, which serves as a touchstone for their family, and has inspired them to plant pollinator positive plants around their home. This design reflects the spirit of Arlington Heights residents and their eagerness to help support the Village’s ecological environment and remain active in supporting local ecosystems. 

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Arlington Heights Park District- The design is meant to represent the playfulness, heart, unity, and power that parks and recreation have in our Village. The imagery involved represent the Park District’s inclusivity of the unique families and residents of Arlington Heights.  

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Jeanne Garrett- Jeanne’s design features and image of the Downtown train station. “I felt there were several buildings that residents would recognize as representing Arlington Heights.  The hospital, the library, Village Hall, Metropolis, several park environments, the train station -- all of these I felt would represent the Village.  I chose the train station because of my personal connection.  We moved to Arlington Heights many years ago because of the easy access to Chicago that the train provided.  And we stayed because we found a community!” 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Kimberly Krall- The artwork includes a rainbow heart being upheld by multi-tonal hands, encircled by the word TOGETHER. According to Kimberly, “This is a tribute to the power of community, kindness, and inclusion. Together we can do amazing things, raise each other up in hard times, and do our best to live up to our reputation as the City of Good Neighbors.”  

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Marina Shniper- The drawing Marina submitted included a scene of a golfer at Nickol Knoll Golf Course. Marina’s submission said, “I live walking distance to Nickol Knoll golf course and that area has spectacular views for people who all join together to enjoy beautiful views.” 


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ARLINGTON HEIGHTS

Helen Gong Weiner- The design is meant to represent how Arlington Heights’ variety of ethnic restaurants represents diverse groups and serves as a destination for residents and visitors. The bright rainbow colors also present LGBTQ+ community that is welcomed in the Arlington Heights. This design focuses on how food invokes conversation and invites connection for all.

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Hope Chiefari- The design includes a variety of newspaper and print clippings into a collage. The items selected in the collage reflect some of the Village’s variety of positive news items that reflect the high quality of life that Arlington Heights residents experience on a daily basis. 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Matthew DeRosa- The design includes a colorful illustration of rainbow-colored slides that are a familiar site at Frontier Days Festival that was started in 1975 and unites residents and visitors from all walks of life for an opportunity to create memories and celebrate the Fourth of July each year in Arlington Heights. 

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Arlington Heights Arts Commission- The design features various Arts Commission events and projects.  The Commission’s mission is to enhance and encourage art in support of cultural advancement within the Village of Arlington Heights.  

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Mike Stone- The design was created to show texture, color and detail as Arlington Heights is a very diverse community that reflects all of these traits. The bright colors are intended to represent the vibrancy of the Arlington Heights community and entertainment options.

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Chaz Quinn- The pencil tree design is meant to represent family, learning and growth. The artwork includes the words family, roots, love, respect, and peace, which are the values in which we live our everyday lives. 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS
Preeti Iqbal- The theme of the design is entertainment and leisure activities against a backdrop of inclusion, symbolized with a rainbow background and the variety of interests that residents and visitors enjoy in Arlington Heights. They include dining, the library, theatre, art, farmers market, sports, music and nature.